thesis on marriage

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Thesis on marriage excuse essays

Thesis on marriage

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He also is correct to argue that marriage, and the sexual difference on which it is built, is grounded in a natural order bearing rights and responsibilities the state should recognize but does not bestow and thus cannot redefine. I do not, make no mistake, object to natural-law reasoning or argumentation.

There is, in C. Indeed, the Holy Scriptures themselves maintain that there are things that we, in J. The Torah and Jesus himself ground sexual and marital fidelity in the creation design. But, in the unveiling of the gospel mystery, the apostles then reveal precisely why this design is so cosmically crucial. The one-flesh union of marriage is patterned after an archetype, that of Christ and his church. A disruption of the marital design harms human flourishing, to be sure, but also defaces the icon of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Our neighbors of no religion and of different religions need not respond, of course, to a call to gospel mystery. We can present to them a case, on their own terms, as to why jettisoning normative marriage is harmful.

We speak publicly of healthy marriages because we love our neighbors and seek their well-being. But we must recognize that at stake is also the very mystery that defines our existence as a church: the gospel of Jesus Christ. Russell D. Moore is the dean of the School of Theology and professor of Christian theology and ethics at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

This was created not so much by any moral ambiguity in his professions per se though some inspired less certainty than others but by two features of my own interpretive hardwiring as a Muslim. The first relates to a certain vigilance vis- -vis any statement that purports to be normative: Is it a statement of fact, morality, or politics? Or is it a moral claim? Or is it a political platform instructing us on what types of relationships the state should tolerate?

As a statement of fact, I doubt this can be empirically substantiated. I agree, however, as a matter of moral conviction, that marriage is the only context in which sexual intimacy should be enjoyed, and I believe that marriage itself is incapable of legitimating all sexual arrangements. Yet I disagree that the state should refuse to tolerate intimacy expressed through any medium other than monogamous, heterosexual marriage.

The second feature of my interpretive hardwiring relates to theology and its ongoing tango with liberalism. Crudely stated, do the dictates of right reason always reflect the concrete will of God? Might not less rational or even a-rational arrangements prove equally God-pleasing, or at least capable of averting divine dissatisfaction? Reason—and, if I understand Farrow correctly, perhaps I should say Rawlsian reason—may demand a public maximum i.

But does religion necessarily proceed on the same calculus? If so, how is it to aid us in reconciling our morally frail, religiously minimalist, private selves with the maximalist moral dictates of a society committed to the supremely rational? I do not wish to be misunderstood here. But I remain hesitant about the implications of giving them full assent as universally valid norms to be uniformly applied to everyone.

Ultimately, I suspect, there is no universal morality that all of us will recognize as such, and it is only the legal monism of the modern state that compels us to look for such. I, for one, welcome the day when we are secure enough to abandon this search and open ourselves to the possibility of political structures that can accommodate multiple communal claims to absolute moral truth.

A s a card-carrying member of the secular right, my response to these thirteen theses is necessarily mixed. Given my lack of faith, the key question is whether religious and non-religious supporters of traditional institutions like marriage can find common ground or, indeed, whether there is any coherent non-faith-based case to be made for social conservatism. These theses suggest a few key features that secular and religious supporters of traditional values share.

First is the assumption that man is by nature fallen. Second is an understanding that each living person must sacrifice for the sake of future generations. For the secular traditionalist, man is inherently weak and imperfect. Although capable of high ideals and a transcendent vision, he is sometimes destined to fall short. For the Christian, man is inherently sinful. However idyllic the conditions, evil is lurking. The question is: What kind of society will bring us closer to the good? Traditionalists of all stripes, I think, believe that clear, coherent, bright-line rules work best.

For the religious, commands for living come from God. For non-believers, longstanding practices that have stood the test of time deserve deference. The distinguished British conservative jurist, Lord Patrick Devlin, said that fornication should be regarded as a natural weakness that can never be rooted out, but must be kept within bounds. Devlin knew that sin would never be eliminated. But he also understood that a clear statement of expectations, and common standards of respectable conduct, would help minimize occasions for sin.

Categorical precepts best guide our behavior, and thus keep transgression within bounds. On this view, moral absolutes are necessary and desirable, regardless of whether and when they are broken. Although habitual flouting can weaken rules, the hope is that bad habits never get out of hand. The critical objective is to prevent a lapse from becoming a way of life. Clear commands accomplish this more effectively than the vague precepts of moral individualism.

This vision stands in contrast to the more enlightened position that regular violations argue for doing away with the rule or at least qualifying it significantly. On this view, a rule is only as good as the number of people who keep it, and hypocrisy espousing a precept while flouting it oneself is ridiculous and morally bankrupt. Violators forfeit the right to endorse moral rules or impose them on others.

On this conception, goodness is achieved not by aspiring to an unattainable ideal but by creating social conditions that remove all occasion for sin. This position secular and religious traditionalists know to be fantastic. Social reform can never eliminate transgression, and sin will always be with us.

What about our vision of the future? Our society is now awash in presentism, evinced by our celebration of a form of marriage that is intrinsically sterile, our diminishing willingness to bear and raise children, and the wanton irresponsibility of reckless entitlement spending and debt. These trends are antithetical to the traditionalist view, whether secular or religious, which sees present generations as stewards of the future.

The covenant between the born and unborn grows weaker, and our sense of responsibility toward lives not yet lived is fading. The principles embodied in these thirteen theses seek to hold back that tide. Better, then, to frame these theses in? It includes, and properly so, interest in receiving oneself as lover by being loved.

Hyper-concern with the reproductive runs the serious risk of occluding this. I rejoin Farrow for theses seven through nine, but have a serious reservation about thesis ten. This thesis needs to acknowledge that there are or may be many partial expressions of the goods proper to human sexuality outside the faithful marriage of man and woman and that sexual expression within the context of marriage may be deeply damaged and profoundly improper, up to and including rape and other forms of sexual violence.

Not to acknowledge these truths risks a theologically inadequate optimism about sex within marriage, along with a blind denial of sexual goods outside marriage. I part again from Farrow on the last clause of thesis eleven, in which he states that the political community is obligated to offer its support to marriage. There is, perhaps, in the order of being such an obligation, but it is certainly not apparent to all ordinarily rational people.

Farrow assumes here, and in theses twelve and thirteen, that the views expressed in the first eleven theses are sufficiently evident to the ordinarily rational person today. In such a situation, the claims of twelve and thirteen seem to many arbitrary and ungrounded—much as their contradictories probably seem to Farrow. This has nothing to do with truth; it has to do with what it is prudent and possible to advocate in our situation. To say what twelve and thirteen say to the pagans of our time is to act like the monoglot Englishman traveling abroad who, when faced with incomprehension by the locals, speaks English louder.

It makes the Church look ridiculous. So I suggest the following thesis: It is time for the Church to treat North American positive law about the contractual form called marriage—a contract dissolvable at the will of either partner—as it already treats North American positive law about the availability of contraception: that is, as something to be tolerated, identified with clarity for what it is, and a golden opportunity for clarifying the truth to the faithful.

Paul Griffiths is Warren Chair of? Catholic Theology at Duke Divinity School. W ith admirable clarity, these theses adumbrate the orthodox Christian, and particularly Catholic, understanding of the goods of sexuality and marriage.

They combine natural-law reasoning and theological claims; fully appreciating them likely requires both the cardinal and theological virtues. In my view, their primary utility will be further to educate and motivate those who already in essence agree with them. But are these formulations likely to encourage skeptics to rethink old positions?

I doubt it. Of course, I bring my own biases to the table. I am a philosophical liberal, a marriage nut, and a wobbly, mostly wannabe, Christian. I agree virtually without reservation with Farrow on theses one, two, four, six, nine, eleven, and twelve. But so what? But in terms of effective communication in the public square, the second one is better. No one can effectively join that debate without confronting this fact. The critical mass of skeptics, seekers, and the undecided have little access to this type of presentation.

This may account for a certain antiseptic sting to his words. We are currently suffering from a profound failure of imagination. We do not lack lists of rules. We lack a belief that we can live by these rules without losing the love and care for one another that help us lead fully human lives.

For me, as a lesbian Catholic with no discernible call to monastic life, the absence within the Christian churches of a deep understanding of the human need for vocation is glaringly obvious. For example, if you are researching the background of spouses who get divorces, an interesting fact to examine might be the history of marriage and divorce of the parents of each spouse.

Write your thesis in simple English, based on your findings. A thesis based on the research you have done will be inherently strong, as you will be able to support it. For example, if you discover that divorce is higher in couples where one person has divorced parents, you could state that couples who have had divorced parents have a higher likelihood of separating. Revise your thesis. Revising is key to creating a strong thesis. Choose more descriptive words and use a declarative tone. For example, you could revise the thesis in step 3 to: Adults who have experienced the divorce of their own parents during childhood have a higher likelihood of terminating their marriage.

Add one adverb to your thesis to give it more of a punch. Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in for the "St.

Petersburg Times.

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As a statement of fact, I doubt this can be empirically substantiated. I agree, however, as a matter of moral conviction, that marriage is the only context in which sexual intimacy should be enjoyed, and I believe that marriage itself is incapable of legitimating all sexual arrangements. Yet I disagree that the state should refuse to tolerate intimacy expressed through any medium other than monogamous, heterosexual marriage. The second feature of my interpretive hardwiring relates to theology and its ongoing tango with liberalism.

Crudely stated, do the dictates of right reason always reflect the concrete will of God? Might not less rational or even a-rational arrangements prove equally God-pleasing, or at least capable of averting divine dissatisfaction? Reason—and, if I understand Farrow correctly, perhaps I should say Rawlsian reason—may demand a public maximum i.

But does religion necessarily proceed on the same calculus? If so, how is it to aid us in reconciling our morally frail, religiously minimalist, private selves with the maximalist moral dictates of a society committed to the supremely rational? I do not wish to be misunderstood here.

But I remain hesitant about the implications of giving them full assent as universally valid norms to be uniformly applied to everyone. Ultimately, I suspect, there is no universal morality that all of us will recognize as such, and it is only the legal monism of the modern state that compels us to look for such.

I, for one, welcome the day when we are secure enough to abandon this search and open ourselves to the possibility of political structures that can accommodate multiple communal claims to absolute moral truth. A s a card-carrying member of the secular right, my response to these thirteen theses is necessarily mixed.

Given my lack of faith, the key question is whether religious and non-religious supporters of traditional institutions like marriage can find common ground or, indeed, whether there is any coherent non-faith-based case to be made for social conservatism.

These theses suggest a few key features that secular and religious supporters of traditional values share. First is the assumption that man is by nature fallen. Second is an understanding that each living person must sacrifice for the sake of future generations. For the secular traditionalist, man is inherently weak and imperfect. Although capable of high ideals and a transcendent vision, he is sometimes destined to fall short.

For the Christian, man is inherently sinful. However idyllic the conditions, evil is lurking. The question is: What kind of society will bring us closer to the good? Traditionalists of all stripes, I think, believe that clear, coherent, bright-line rules work best. For the religious, commands for living come from God. For non-believers, longstanding practices that have stood the test of time deserve deference. The distinguished British conservative jurist, Lord Patrick Devlin, said that fornication should be regarded as a natural weakness that can never be rooted out, but must be kept within bounds.

Devlin knew that sin would never be eliminated. But he also understood that a clear statement of expectations, and common standards of respectable conduct, would help minimize occasions for sin. Categorical precepts best guide our behavior, and thus keep transgression within bounds. On this view, moral absolutes are necessary and desirable, regardless of whether and when they are broken.

Although habitual flouting can weaken rules, the hope is that bad habits never get out of hand. The critical objective is to prevent a lapse from becoming a way of life. Clear commands accomplish this more effectively than the vague precepts of moral individualism.

This vision stands in contrast to the more enlightened position that regular violations argue for doing away with the rule or at least qualifying it significantly. On this view, a rule is only as good as the number of people who keep it, and hypocrisy espousing a precept while flouting it oneself is ridiculous and morally bankrupt.

Violators forfeit the right to endorse moral rules or impose them on others. On this conception, goodness is achieved not by aspiring to an unattainable ideal but by creating social conditions that remove all occasion for sin. This position secular and religious traditionalists know to be fantastic. Social reform can never eliminate transgression, and sin will always be with us.

What about our vision of the future? Our society is now awash in presentism, evinced by our celebration of a form of marriage that is intrinsically sterile, our diminishing willingness to bear and raise children, and the wanton irresponsibility of reckless entitlement spending and debt. These trends are antithetical to the traditionalist view, whether secular or religious, which sees present generations as stewards of the future. The covenant between the born and unborn grows weaker, and our sense of responsibility toward lives not yet lived is fading.

The principles embodied in these thirteen theses seek to hold back that tide. Better, then, to frame these theses in? It includes, and properly so, interest in receiving oneself as lover by being loved. Hyper-concern with the reproductive runs the serious risk of occluding this.

I rejoin Farrow for theses seven through nine, but have a serious reservation about thesis ten. This thesis needs to acknowledge that there are or may be many partial expressions of the goods proper to human sexuality outside the faithful marriage of man and woman and that sexual expression within the context of marriage may be deeply damaged and profoundly improper, up to and including rape and other forms of sexual violence.

Not to acknowledge these truths risks a theologically inadequate optimism about sex within marriage, along with a blind denial of sexual goods outside marriage. I part again from Farrow on the last clause of thesis eleven, in which he states that the political community is obligated to offer its support to marriage. There is, perhaps, in the order of being such an obligation, but it is certainly not apparent to all ordinarily rational people.

Farrow assumes here, and in theses twelve and thirteen, that the views expressed in the first eleven theses are sufficiently evident to the ordinarily rational person today. In such a situation, the claims of twelve and thirteen seem to many arbitrary and ungrounded—much as their contradictories probably seem to Farrow.

This has nothing to do with truth; it has to do with what it is prudent and possible to advocate in our situation. To say what twelve and thirteen say to the pagans of our time is to act like the monoglot Englishman traveling abroad who, when faced with incomprehension by the locals, speaks English louder. It makes the Church look ridiculous. So I suggest the following thesis: It is time for the Church to treat North American positive law about the contractual form called marriage—a contract dissolvable at the will of either partner—as it already treats North American positive law about the availability of contraception: that is, as something to be tolerated, identified with clarity for what it is, and a golden opportunity for clarifying the truth to the faithful.

Paul Griffiths is Warren Chair of? Catholic Theology at Duke Divinity School. W ith admirable clarity, these theses adumbrate the orthodox Christian, and particularly Catholic, understanding of the goods of sexuality and marriage. They combine natural-law reasoning and theological claims; fully appreciating them likely requires both the cardinal and theological virtues.

In my view, their primary utility will be further to educate and motivate those who already in essence agree with them. But are these formulations likely to encourage skeptics to rethink old positions? I doubt it. Of course, I bring my own biases to the table. I am a philosophical liberal, a marriage nut, and a wobbly, mostly wannabe, Christian.

I agree virtually without reservation with Farrow on theses one, two, four, six, nine, eleven, and twelve. But so what? But in terms of effective communication in the public square, the second one is better. No one can effectively join that debate without confronting this fact. The critical mass of skeptics, seekers, and the undecided have little access to this type of presentation.

This may account for a certain antiseptic sting to his words. We are currently suffering from a profound failure of imagination. We do not lack lists of rules. We lack a belief that we can live by these rules without losing the love and care for one another that help us lead fully human lives.

For me, as a lesbian Catholic with no discernible call to monastic life, the absence within the Christian churches of a deep understanding of the human need for vocation is glaringly obvious. But this void in our culture damages everyone.

The winners from a secular perspective—mainly the rich and well-educated, who are more likely to marry and to practice a religion—choose their own adventure, reaping the benefits of freedom and mobility. The losers get lost, drifting without familial support. In this world, no one is called to a life of sacrifice; they either choose the life they want and claim it, or long for it and never find it.

So here are a few initial theses of my own, on the vocations crisis which has spurred Farrow to write his theses. A vocation is a call to pour out your life in loving service. Everyone has a vocation in this sense. Some are called to pour out that love directly to God. Most of us, not being hermits, also are called to love and serve others: a parish priest his parishioners, a cloistered nun her community, a wife her husband, a father his children.

Each vocation has its own characteristic loneliness—a crown of thorns as well as a crown of stars. Loneliness is an intrinsic element of marriage. None of these lonelinesses are signs of failure as long as you are still willing to extend yourself in love toward God and others. The fear and loneliness of love can be borne more easily when our vocations are publicly acknowledged and honored.

Over the past century, marriage, priesthood and religious life, and friendship have all lost a great deal of societal honor. The sacrifices are just as necessary as they always were. If we want people to make them, though, we need to honor them.