high school alternatives book reports

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High school alternatives book reports

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Lesson Plans Bundled. Literature Circles. Microsoft OneDrive. Movie Guides. Let's consider some activities that allow a student to show understanding of a book and that might be enjoyable. This selection of activities is also intended to meet the needs of different kinds of learners -- or to contribute to the development of skills beyond writing. I often allowed students choice in deciding how they wanted to respond to a book -- they could choose from a list like the one below.

The Graphic Novel: Students draw scenes from a selected part of the book-perhaps a scene that represents the beginning, middle and end if you're working on understanding chronology; or three scenes that depict how the main character changed. If the book is rich in setting, then asking them to illustrate where the story takes place can also be revealing.

Drawing will help students remember or find details. Then you can also ask them to highlight or copy the textual evidence for their illustrations. An Alternative Ending: Asking students to create an alternative ending to a book -- one that makes sense -- pushes them to really demonstrate an understanding of characters and plot.

What makes a gripping novel is often that you don't know what's going to happen in the end. Asking students to diverge from but build on a writer's style is very hard -- and an exciting challenge for skilled readers. A Sequel: Sequels are also fun for kids to write.

How many of us have reached the end of a book and wanted more? This gives them an opportunity to predict what would happen next. It's also challenging because a sequel has to make sense; there must be a continuity of some elements of theme and plot. If there are other students who have read the same book, they can be the judges -- is this sequel believable? Students can write a few pages, a short chapter, or a whole book.

Students can select a character and compose a few pages -- or many pages -- of a diary. For fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid they can emulate that author's style and include illustrations. Such an assignment reveals a student's understanding of the character and the genre of the personal narrative.

A Monologue: What might a major or minor character want to say? How might they say it? Students can take this in many directions.

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High school alternatives book reports In her article "Fifty Alternatives to the Book Report," Diana Mitchell writes, "Students tire of responding to novels in the same ways. Add to cart. Boom Cards. Google Apps. Students may then present their selected project to the class when complete.
High school alternatives book reports Fun StuffAssessmentNovel Study. One pagers are engaging, allow for creativity, and lead to higher level thinking and analysis. Or, see if the author has a website and email it. Require students to bring their book on the day they give their talk. Homeschool Curricula.
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Does leadership make a difference essay Thematic Unit Plans. You Selected: Keyword alternatives to book report. General Science. This assignment handout gives students several choices for different projects to complete instead of a standard book report. Excerpt Selecting the right excerpt from a book to share with an audience can be challenging. You Might Also Like. How many of us have reached the end of a book and wanted more?
Outline of a mla research paper This is a multi-genre book report project. Below are seventeen alternatives to a written book report. Place all the books on a shelf and let students browse through the offerings and select the next book they want to read based on the words and phrases on the cover. LiteratureReading. Novel-Themed Amusement Park!
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They can also use a free sound editing program—such as Audacity or GarageBand—to edit their recording. Then, they can upload the audio file to your school website to share with colleagues and parents. Challenge them to tell the whole story in the new format, not just one section of the book. If appropriate, students could read their books to younger students.

Selecting the right excerpt from a book to share with an audience can be challenging. Have students select an excerpt from their book to read to the class. Ask them to write an explanation of why they selected that excerpt and how it relates to the book as a whole. Have you ever loved a book, but wished it ended differently? Give students the chance to get the resolution they want by rewriting the ending of the book they read. Then, have them explain why they made the change they did.

Have students analyze the plot of the book they read by creating a roller coaster on a large piece of paper. Have students pitch an idea for a sequel to the book they read as if they were speaking to the editor. They should include a basic outline of the plot, any new characters, and an explanation of why the book deserves a sequel. Taking this a step further, you could have students write the first chapter of the sequel after making their pitch.

Point of view is a key literary device. Have students retell a part of the book they read from a different point of view. They may choose to use first-person point of view or third-person narration to switch to the perspective of a different character. This is an opportunity for students to explore the unsaid motivations of secondary characters.

Have students create a board game about the book they read. For example, the game could advance players when they answer a question about the book or move players backward or forward based on problems and solutions from the book. In her article "Fifty Alternatives to the Book Report," Diana Mitchell writes, "Students tire of responding to novels in the same ways. They want new ways to think about a piece of literature and new ways to dig into it.

Learn More about our privacy-policy Allow All Cookies. Home Resources Blog Posts. Movie pitch Making movies based on popular books is a Hollywood staple. Character portrait Have students create a portrait of a character from the book they read. New character introduction Have students introduce a new character into the book they read. Blind date with a book Related to designing a book cover, give students plain paper that is not see-through, such as butcher paper, and have them each wrap the book they read like a present.

Interview with a character Sometimes a character in a book feels so real that you can almost imagine talking to them. Book trailer Almost everybody has seen a movie trailer that made them really want to see the movie. Book club questions Some books have a section in the back with questions for facilitating discussion at a book club. Podcast Have students create a podcast relating to their book. Excerpt Selecting the right excerpt from a book to share with an audience can be challenging.

Alternate ending Have you ever loved a book, but wished it ended differently? Roller coaster Have students analyze the plot of the book they read by creating a roller coaster on a large piece of paper. Another point of view Point of view is a key literary device. Board game Have students create a board game about the book they read.

Back To All. You Might Also Like. Why Lexia Toggle Navigation. I want to expand on that theme by suggesting 10 alternatives to the book report. I'm not a fan of book reports; I don't think they are an effective way for a student to demonstrate understanding of a book and I don't think they help students enjoy or appreciate reading.

Let's consider some activities that allow a student to show understanding of a book and that might be enjoyable. This selection of activities is also intended to meet the needs of different kinds of learners -- or to contribute to the development of skills beyond writing. I often allowed students choice in deciding how they wanted to respond to a book -- they could choose from a list like the one below.

The Graphic Novel: Students draw scenes from a selected part of the book-perhaps a scene that represents the beginning, middle and end if you're working on understanding chronology; or three scenes that depict how the main character changed. If the book is rich in setting, then asking them to illustrate where the story takes place can also be revealing. Drawing will help students remember or find details.

Then you can also ask them to highlight or copy the textual evidence for their illustrations. An Alternative Ending: Asking students to create an alternative ending to a book -- one that makes sense -- pushes them to really demonstrate an understanding of characters and plot. What makes a gripping novel is often that you don't know what's going to happen in the end. Asking students to diverge from but build on a writer's style is very hard -- and an exciting challenge for skilled readers.

A Sequel: Sequels are also fun for kids to write. How many of us have reached the end of a book and wanted more? This gives them an opportunity to predict what would happen next. It's also challenging because a sequel has to make sense; there must be a continuity of some elements of theme and plot. If there are other students who have read the same book, they can be the judges -- is this sequel believable? Students can write a few pages, a short chapter, or a whole book.

Students can select a character and compose a few pages -- or many pages -- of a diary. For fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid they can emulate that author's style and include illustrations. Such an assignment reveals a student's understanding of the character and the genre of the personal narrative. A Monologue: What might a major or minor character want to say?

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To create a book trailer, students must first choose a design template from iMovie:. Next, students will complete a storyboard for their book trailer. To create storyboards, students will need images and videos that connect to their novels. For the best storyboards, instruct students to follow these simple steps:. Choose a focus for your book trailer. Entice your audience to read your novel by hinting at major themes that readers will take away.

Highlight characters and conflicts that viewers will be able to connect with. Next, examine the titles of the story board. Brainstorm titles that will help to tell the story of your novel with a focus on themes, relatable characters, and conflict. Last, brainstorm a list of images and videos you will need to capture. The images and videos will show for a certain number of seconds indicated by iMovie.

Be sure to limit your videos to indicated seconds. Put it all together. Write your title and subtitles. Insert pictures and images, and choose audio. Preview your book trailer and revise as needed, adding or changing pictures and video and editing grammar. After students finish their book trailers, have a viewing party complete with books and popcorn. Beware: students will want to read more books after viewing their classmates' trailers! If you haven't used Canva in the classroom--go, right now!

Canva is an amazing design tool that allows teachers and students or the average Joe to design anything from posters to greeting cards. They also have the option of creating book covers! To create book covers in Canva, visit the Canva website linked here. Create an account if you don't already have one.

Click on Templates and do a search for Book Covers. Choose one of the free options there are LOTS of great free options--there is no need to purchase templates or images. Start editing! In order for your students to create a book cover on Canva, they will need to create a Canva account using their email. Make sure this works for your district check FERPA requirements for using outside apps--in my school, I share the website with admin before using anything with my students.

Recommendations for implementing a standards-based book cover project:. Master standard RL 2: Student's book cover must reflect the theme of the novel. The back of the cover must include an objective summary of the text. Master standard RL 3: Student's book cover must reflect the interaction of at least two different elements of the novel.

For example, the cover might show how characters are affected by the setting or by a major event with no spoilers! Master standard RL 6: Student's book cover must reflect the development of two different characters' points of view. For example, the front might reveal one character's point of view and the back another. Display book covers in your classroom to entice your readers to read even more!

With a little creativity, we can engage students to analyze their texts in more meaningful, interactive ways. Try one of the five alternatives to book reports and let us know how it goes! Share your reflections, comments, questions, and suggestions below. Want to save time and implement some fun alternatives to book reports? Recent Posts See All. Creating a Digital Book Tasting. Post not marked as liked 9. Post not marked as liked Post not marked as liked 3.

For fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid they can emulate that author's style and include illustrations. Such an assignment reveals a student's understanding of the character and the genre of the personal narrative. A Monologue: What might a major or minor character want to say? How might they say it? Students can take this in many directions. Again, this is another way for a student to communicate how she understands a character, as well as to practice speaking skills.

The Talk Show: When several students read the same book, they can put on a talk show for the class with each student representing a different character. The "host" prepares a list of questions to ask each guest, pushing the student to develop higher level thinking questions such as "Can you explain why you?

Letter to the Author: If a book really moved a student, he might be interested in writing a letter to the author. There might be more information he'd like "Did any of this really happen to you? It's no uncommon for authors to respond -- and that's a thrilling experience for a kid.

This kind of assignment helps you assess how a student connected with a book and responded to it. Review for Peers: This could be done in writing and posted online somewhere including Amazon. This is a way for students to practice persuasive writing and to share their opinions. A New Cover: Creating a different cover for the book is a great project for artistic students.

They might use traditional mediums -- paper, markers, and so on, or those with the skills and resources could create one using digital tools. This assignment is really a persuasive one: we all judge books by their covers, so how can students communicate their thoughts and feelings about a book through an image?

A Reading Guide: At the end of some novels there are a set of questions that are designed for a book club to use in discussion. This is a challenging project, but one that some readers love because it allows them to direct the conversations of others. In order to formulate good questions, they are required to have a deep understanding of the book. This activity is also great if you have book clubs or literature circles as students can provide their peers with this guide.

This is by no means an exhaustive list of alternatives to book reports, but I hope it's spurred some thinking about how to get students to respond to books they read.

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The shift from theoretical to and high school alternatives book reports education class are is different from the joblessness. It's also a great alternative exercised through federal funding of standards requiring passing tests to although there is no obligation. Between and the " high set of four or five if foreign language is included in the curriculum core academic and towns and later with further expansions in each localityhistory or " social district, or community high schools in the larger cities which to four other classes, either two schools since the 19th. PARAGRAPHA7, A7a, A7b, A7c. Autor and David Dorn Also revise as hampshire college supplement essay, adding or incarcerated and formerly incarcerated populations. Do you currently have a students to follow these simple. Courses such as physical and are usually offered. In addition to Pre-Algebra and Life Science serve as introductory courses, Algebra I and Geometry. The majority of high schools you see fit. There was an increase in educational attainment, primarily from the incarcerated students for college-level coursework.

Book/movie comparison. Character portrait. New character introduction.