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Read on to see some awesome ESL blogs. Mondo's World Students and teachers alike can take advantage of the numerous video lessons, song lessons, and writing classes on this resource-rich blog. There are also cartoons, suggestions for discussions by level, writing topics, podcasts, and grammar lessons. There are links to newspapers, books, and useful videos.

Blog posts cover all of the above and more. This is a great site that can be used inside and outside the classroom! Kalinago English Find loads of links and resources for teachers and students, including blogs, lessons, tips broken down by category , helpful Web sites, recommended books, and more. The author also conducts workshops. A very professional site that's well organized and should be bookmarked by any ESL teacher! Inspiration Lane Students and teachers alike will find plenty to be inspired by at this site, which is full of resources for the classroom.

There are quotes, articles and recipes of the day, as well as activities for singing grammar lessons, writing comic captions, and writing poetry. There are useful links for ESL games, dictionaries, a daily challenge, and more.

The most recent blog post uses the finale of Lost as a teaching lesson, with a sample dialogue, discussion questions, and grammar points. The English Blog Video clips, cartoons, and the latest headlines are used as instructional tools on this hands-on site that features a diverse array of resources for teachers. There are reviews on products and services, as well as links to lesson plans, useful teaching resources, and ideas for the classroom.

This is a great site with lots of content that teachers will find useful for planning lessons or filling in classroom activities! The author also shares stories about her students and tips on becoming a self-employed tutor. There are also numerous helpful links to resources and other ESL blogs. The English Desk This Canadian blog features podcasts of narrated passages of text to help students practice their listening and pronunciation skills. Each podcast is accompanied by the written text, which students can use to check listening comprehension or to read aloud to practice pronunciation.

The podcasts are also available for download, and there are companion exercises and activities. Her informative blog includes lots of useful resources for teachers, including games, crafts, ideas, lesson plans, suggestions for classroom management, and specific ideas for teaching and connecting with babies. Blog posts cover a variety of topics related to teaching and best practices, but there are also posts on finding ESL jobs and professional development. Jamie Keddie. His site includes lesson plans, articles and a wide array of informative blog posts on different teaching methods and ideas.

EFL 2. An ELT Notebook Part resource guide for teachers of all experience, and part forum in which to share ideas and hold discussions about teaching ESL, this blog is run by a EFL teacher and teacher trainer with over 30 years experience. There are lesson plans and guides according to topic of interest, as well as links to various resources such as books and Web sites. English for University This blog is meant to help international students prepare for and do well in college.

Yollis and her students list their top 12 quarantine essentials. Curation Posts : Sometimes a blog post or page is used to curate a list of resources on a particular topic. This page of live events and virtual field trips is an example of a curated list from Mrs. Ongoing Series : Choose any of the above, but split it up into several shorter posts that get published over a set period of time.

The posts could connect sequentially, or just fall under the same umbrella topic. For example, Sheri Edwards did a series of posts using the Slice of Life writing prompts. There are a number of ideas on how to structure posts. You might want to stick to a consistent style or mix things up. Of course, some prompts could fit into more than one category. Share your hobbies, interests, family background, and anything else you want others to know while remembering to protect your personal information if your site is public.

This post on the Student Blogging Challenge demonstrates some different ways you can make an avatar using online tools. There is some information and examples on the Student Blogging Challenge site on how to write commenting guidelines. For example, you could publish one goal for this week, one goal for this month, and one goal for this school year. Describe how you plan to accomplish your goals. Include photos or videos if you have permission. Alternatively, you could write about your dream vacation.

Where would you go and what would you do? It could be someone you know in real life or someone famous from the past or present. What is it about this person that makes them so special? You could write a post focusing on food, festivals, songs, stories, clothing, geography, or anything else. You could focus on the buildings, write about someone who used to go to the school, or reflect on how the curriculum or rules have changed.

Use your imagination; your dream classroom could be indoors, outdoors, in a school, or somewhere else! You could write about your favorite animal, TV show, movie, holiday, sports, or hobbies. Readers could answer in a comment or in Google Forms. This could be a great way to get to know your audience. You might like to do a follow-up post that goes over the results, including graphs, charts, and analysis.

BEAM is a simple tool for making basic charts. Make sure you approve it before publishing. For example, you could rank your favorite songs, actors, sports, or foods. There might be interesting people at your school you could interview too like your principal, cleaner, librarian, or crossing supervisor. Invite your readers to share their own wishes in a comment. Check out the YouTube playlists of prompts here. Another initiative from The New York Times, a graph, map, or chart is published regularly as an invitation for students to discuss.

Find a graph that fascinates you and share your interpretation. One example is Visual Poetry where you can display your writing in artistic and whimsical ways. Screenshot your creation for a blog post. You will find jokes, quotes, recipes, videos, and more. Find one that interests you and share a response on your blog. Have a browse and see if there is a prompt to inspire a new post.

You could choose the daily wonder or a past wonder and reflect or summarize it in a blog post. You can even add a Wonderopolis widget to your blog. There may be a prompt to get your creative juices flowing. This is best for middle school or high school students. Go to the byrdseed site to generate your prompts. You can then copy the emojis into a post and write a story based on them.

Embed the conversation on your blog or take a screenshot. Student and class posts are visited by a global audience. Maybe you can join us for the next challenge? Include any questions you still have and a list of any assignments or tasks you still need to complete. Explain why you chose the quote and what it means to you. We have a post all about using quotes that will give you some tips. Find some online or share your own favorite jokes to give your readers a laugh.

Alternatively, you could reveal the answers in the comments section. Perhaps this could become a weekly practice. Write a post to explain the special day and what it means to you. Teacher tip: You may want to choose the days for younger students, rather than allowing them to browse these sites. Share the pros, cons, and a star rating. You might get some ideas from the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation.

Share a recipe that you enjoy eating or making. Spice up your post with a photo of the end result. Perhaps a number could represent each letter of the alphabet or you could write each word backwards. Ask readers to guess what the post says in a comment.

If you choose a local sport, perhaps you could interview some participants or coaches. You could even interview others to find out their thoughts on the future. Maybe you could ask someone older than you what the trends were when they were at school. You could even sort your suggestions into age groups. Maybe you have tips for managing homework or chores at home, using a diary or calendar, or making lists.

Write a post, create a video, or design a poster to teach others about these topics. Share these with others in a post, a video, comics, memes, or posters. Check out these internet safety tips for students for ideas. Maybe you could make tutorials on things like adding images to your post, making a custom header, or adding links to your site. You could even make a screencast using a tool like Loom or Screencastify.

Students and the community are invited to send in photos and captions. You could create a similar style blog or post series. Create a poem, story, information report, or any other style of writing based on your image. Some examples are Google Drawings , emoji. Add your image to a post and tell your readers about it. Alternatively, create infographics using several of these different tools then write a review of the tools you used. Which one was best and why? You could include written instructions, photos, or videos.

Not sure what craft to try? Do some research and write a post about it. Add an image or video to your post if you can too. Your playlist might even be for a specific occasion like a birthday party, wedding, or school graduation. You could even make a soundtrack of your life! Invite your readers to put their guesses in a comment. Film yourself and add your video to a post. Have your readers guess the sounds in a comment.

Or maybe you could create some BookSnaps annotated photos of text from a book. You might also like to try a ReadWriteThink poetry interactive that guides you through the writing process then publish your poem on your blog. This free web tool helps you find new words to describe nouns. Try out the tool and reflect on your discoveries in a post.

You can ask for feedback from readers in the comments. Alternatively, you could write two different endings and have readers vote for their favorite. Include your thoughts or research on why these words were introduced in that year. Then summarize a news story for your readers with your own reflections or opinions included. You could embed one in a blog post and write a script, recount, or reflection on the meaning behind the video.

Jake Miller has made a useful GIF to explain how to do this. Finally, if you want to know how to embed your Google Slides presentation into a post, these instructions walk you through it. Define the words or create interesting sentences to share with readers. You could even use a site like Spelling City and screenshot some of your activities.

You could make a comic, a poster, a video, a quiz, a song, or anything else! It even includes fake news stories, advertisements, and a comic. Share some basic words and phrases with your audience. You could even add a voice recording or video.

The We Are Teachers website lists 25 of the best virtual field trips to explore. You could share a tour across your town, country, or anywhere in the world. You can also make a tour to map the journey of a historical figure. You can share your tour by embedding it onto your site.

You might want to base your issue on The Sustainable Development Goals. The 17 goals focus on things like poverty, hunger, health, education, and climate action. You could use a tool like Canva or Google Drawings to create the brochure and then add it to your blog as a PDF or image file. Try out his method then add your image to a post with some facts about the landmark. Make a Venn diagram to compare and contrast. You could use an online tool like Visual Paradigm or something like Canva or Google Drawings to make the Venn diagram.

Or you could draw the diagram on paper and take a photo to add to your post. See if your readers can make an accurate guess in a comment. Ask your readers to share their guess in a comment. For example, you might want to look at the public domain collection from The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It includes more than , images from The Met collection that are free to use.

Share some images in a post and write your own description. Or ask your readers to guess what they think the images are. Find a page that interests you to print and color. Then add a photo of your completed work to your blog and write a description. Traditionally, you could make a timeline on paper but there are now lots of online tools that help you make your timeline with multimedia. Richard Byrne compares the best tools to use in this post. Try out one of the tools and add your timeline to a post.

Link to the article in your post and write an analysis. Alternatively, you might like to design your own flag. Include the image in a post with a description of your flag. Create a story based on a certain time and location in history. You would keep the main historical information accurate while coming up with fictional characters and perhaps storylines. Or you could even share some of your own history. Everyone has a story! What are the similarities and differences in the maps?

Maybe some things have been added, removed, replaced, or extended. If you want to take it a step further, Richard Byrne demonstrates how to overlay an old map over a current Google Map. Check out this vocabulary slide deck template by Meagan Kelly which you could fill out and embed in your blog. Take photos and add them to a post. Maybe you could look for mathematical arrays, 3 digit numbers, fractions, or patterns.

There are some on Riddles. After trying some out yourself, share your favorites on your blog or make up your own. Invite your readers to solve your riddles in a comment. The students in Mr. Students can submit answers on the website, but you can also publish your response on your blog or portfolio. Problems are broken up into age groups. Share your estimations on your blog and then measure or count to find out the actual answer.

How far off were you? How did you make your estimates and how did you find out the actual answers? Here is some math journal prompts from ReadWriteThink that you could base your reflections on. Tip: choose a problem where there are multiple solutions, or hold off on moderating comments until a few readers have had the chance to respond. Maybe you could explain the answer in a follow-up post. Set up some photos of your own to add to a blog post and share your thoughts on how the images are similar and different.

Make up your own image or link to one from the website. Then tell your readers what you would rather and justify your response.

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You could choose the daily wonder or a past wonder and reflect or summarize it in a blog post. You can even add a Wonderopolis widget to your blog. There may be a prompt to get your creative juices flowing. This is best for middle school or high school students. Go to the byrdseed site to generate your prompts.

You can then copy the emojis into a post and write a story based on them. Embed the conversation on your blog or take a screenshot. Student and class posts are visited by a global audience. Maybe you can join us for the next challenge? Include any questions you still have and a list of any assignments or tasks you still need to complete. Explain why you chose the quote and what it means to you. We have a post all about using quotes that will give you some tips.

Find some online or share your own favorite jokes to give your readers a laugh. Alternatively, you could reveal the answers in the comments section. Perhaps this could become a weekly practice. Write a post to explain the special day and what it means to you. Teacher tip: You may want to choose the days for younger students, rather than allowing them to browse these sites. Share the pros, cons, and a star rating. You might get some ideas from the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation. Share a recipe that you enjoy eating or making.

Spice up your post with a photo of the end result. Perhaps a number could represent each letter of the alphabet or you could write each word backwards. Ask readers to guess what the post says in a comment. If you choose a local sport, perhaps you could interview some participants or coaches. You could even interview others to find out their thoughts on the future. Maybe you could ask someone older than you what the trends were when they were at school. You could even sort your suggestions into age groups.

Maybe you have tips for managing homework or chores at home, using a diary or calendar, or making lists. Write a post, create a video, or design a poster to teach others about these topics. Share these with others in a post, a video, comics, memes, or posters.

Check out these internet safety tips for students for ideas. Maybe you could make tutorials on things like adding images to your post, making a custom header, or adding links to your site. You could even make a screencast using a tool like Loom or Screencastify. Students and the community are invited to send in photos and captions. You could create a similar style blog or post series.

Create a poem, story, information report, or any other style of writing based on your image. Some examples are Google Drawings , emoji. Add your image to a post and tell your readers about it. Alternatively, create infographics using several of these different tools then write a review of the tools you used. Which one was best and why? You could include written instructions, photos, or videos. Not sure what craft to try? Do some research and write a post about it. Add an image or video to your post if you can too.

Your playlist might even be for a specific occasion like a birthday party, wedding, or school graduation. You could even make a soundtrack of your life! Invite your readers to put their guesses in a comment. Film yourself and add your video to a post. Have your readers guess the sounds in a comment.

Or maybe you could create some BookSnaps annotated photos of text from a book. You might also like to try a ReadWriteThink poetry interactive that guides you through the writing process then publish your poem on your blog. This free web tool helps you find new words to describe nouns. Try out the tool and reflect on your discoveries in a post. You can ask for feedback from readers in the comments. Alternatively, you could write two different endings and have readers vote for their favorite.

Include your thoughts or research on why these words were introduced in that year. Then summarize a news story for your readers with your own reflections or opinions included. You could embed one in a blog post and write a script, recount, or reflection on the meaning behind the video. Jake Miller has made a useful GIF to explain how to do this. Finally, if you want to know how to embed your Google Slides presentation into a post, these instructions walk you through it.

Define the words or create interesting sentences to share with readers. You could even use a site like Spelling City and screenshot some of your activities. You could make a comic, a poster, a video, a quiz, a song, or anything else! It even includes fake news stories, advertisements, and a comic.

Share some basic words and phrases with your audience. You could even add a voice recording or video. The We Are Teachers website lists 25 of the best virtual field trips to explore. You could share a tour across your town, country, or anywhere in the world.

You can also make a tour to map the journey of a historical figure. You can share your tour by embedding it onto your site. You might want to base your issue on The Sustainable Development Goals. The 17 goals focus on things like poverty, hunger, health, education, and climate action.

You could use a tool like Canva or Google Drawings to create the brochure and then add it to your blog as a PDF or image file. Try out his method then add your image to a post with some facts about the landmark. Make a Venn diagram to compare and contrast. You could use an online tool like Visual Paradigm or something like Canva or Google Drawings to make the Venn diagram.

Or you could draw the diagram on paper and take a photo to add to your post. See if your readers can make an accurate guess in a comment. Ask your readers to share their guess in a comment. For example, you might want to look at the public domain collection from The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

It includes more than , images from The Met collection that are free to use. Share some images in a post and write your own description. Or ask your readers to guess what they think the images are. Find a page that interests you to print and color. Then add a photo of your completed work to your blog and write a description. Traditionally, you could make a timeline on paper but there are now lots of online tools that help you make your timeline with multimedia. Richard Byrne compares the best tools to use in this post.

Try out one of the tools and add your timeline to a post. Link to the article in your post and write an analysis. Alternatively, you might like to design your own flag. Include the image in a post with a description of your flag. Create a story based on a certain time and location in history. You would keep the main historical information accurate while coming up with fictional characters and perhaps storylines.

Or you could even share some of your own history. Everyone has a story! What are the similarities and differences in the maps? Maybe some things have been added, removed, replaced, or extended. If you want to take it a step further, Richard Byrne demonstrates how to overlay an old map over a current Google Map.

Check out this vocabulary slide deck template by Meagan Kelly which you could fill out and embed in your blog. Take photos and add them to a post. Maybe you could look for mathematical arrays, 3 digit numbers, fractions, or patterns. There are some on Riddles. After trying some out yourself, share your favorites on your blog or make up your own. Invite your readers to solve your riddles in a comment.

The students in Mr. Students can submit answers on the website, but you can also publish your response on your blog or portfolio. Problems are broken up into age groups. Share your estimations on your blog and then measure or count to find out the actual answer. How far off were you? How did you make your estimates and how did you find out the actual answers? Here is some math journal prompts from ReadWriteThink that you could base your reflections on. Tip: choose a problem where there are multiple solutions, or hold off on moderating comments until a few readers have had the chance to respond.

Maybe you could explain the answer in a follow-up post. Set up some photos of your own to add to a blog post and share your thoughts on how the images are similar and different. Make up your own image or link to one from the website. Then tell your readers what you would rather and justify your response. You might be able to find some images using the Creative Commons search engine. Try out a game and then share a review. Include details like how to access the game, what it helps you learn, pros and cons, and an age recommendation.

Science Master is a safe site where you can submit your own science question and get a personalized answer. Check out this post on The Edublogger to find out a bit more about how it works. After you submit your question, write about it on your own blog. For example, Try This! With permission from an adult, replicate the experiment and then blog about it.

Find a video that interests you, then write a post about it. You might write a summary of the video and include your own thoughts or questions. Alternatively, you can make a quiz for your readers about the video. Invite them to answer the quiz in a comment. Your task is to write a post that includes two correct statements and one incorrect statement.

Ask your readers to guess the lie! Your statements could be about a certain math or science topic or a mix of topics. There are games, activities, articles, videos, and more. Write a post about something you learned from the website. Share a summary in your own words on your blog. There are lots of sites and apps you can use to learn to code.

Try out one of the activities and then write a post about it. Explain what you learned and what challenges you had to overcome to complete the activity. Perhaps you could even interview someone in the profession. Alternatively, you could choose two careers and compare them in a post. Make a diagram with labels to illustrate a scientific concept e. Check out Science A-Z for some examples of science diagrams. Make your diagram on paper and upload a photo or use an online tool like Canva or Google Drawings.

The images, text, videos, and other objects are placed on the canvas and users can zoom in and out. The simplest way to use Google Slides is to create a slide deck. That is, a collection of slides put together to form a presentation. Share your animation and write about the decisions you made when making the video. Voki characters can be customized to look like historical figures, cartoons, animals, or yourself! Voki characters can be embedded on your site on a post, page, or sidebar.

Add your word cloud to your blog. You could even invite readers to guess the topic. Ask your readers to leave a comment to tell you how they went with the puzzle. You can sign up for free or create a quick collection without signing up. Embed your Wakelet in a post. Read more about getting started with Wakelet. You make an AnswerGarden with a question and then embed or link to it on your site. These are all words that were added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in Every year, the gurus in the dictionary world decide which words deserve official recognition, and then induct selected new words into the English language.

Sometime in the last 10 years, we welcomed another member to the family of dictionary-approved words: blogosphere. But for teachers, that word can mean so much more. Blogs are actually a great resource for teachers and students alike—if you know how to use them effectively.

Yes, people write about all those topics and so very many more. So take a deep breath as we dive into the blogosphere. Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. Blogs make great reading resources for ESL students. If you can think of a topic, odds are someone writes a blog about it. On this blog, your students can find information on all things related to universities. Another way to get your students excited about reading is by directing them to blogs about entertainment and celebrities.

They write mostly about movies from and earlier, and since many of these movies are freely available at libraries, this blog might be a good place to start before doing a film-based lesson in class. The English Blog is a great resource for news that will interest your students, and news is another great go-to when it comes to getting ESL students to read.

Today, many social interactions happen through a virtual lens, and commenting on blogs is a very practical way to do that. Basically, your ESL students can have conversations with the bloggers who post the content. There are three simple guidelines to making a good blog comment.

First, give the comment context. Students can quote from the article, paraphrase a passage or summarize what they read, and all of those are great skills for ESL students to practice. Secondly, comments should be respectful. In many ways, our society has forgotten how to agree to disagree. When different cultures come into the mix, disagreements are bound to happen even more often. One-word comments are not helpful to bloggers. To encourage a true conversation, even one limited to the comments section of a blog, encourage your students to express themselves clearly and completely.

Encourage your students to leave a comment and strike up a conversation with any of the students there. Not every blog is made for the entertainment of the masses. In fact, in recent years some teachers have started their own blogs solely for classroom communication purposes. You can post links to informational videos, interactive practice sites and other resources for your students to read or watch while at home. The blog was last updated several years ago but you can still use it as a model or for inspiration when you want to set up a classroom blog for yourself and your students.

I have a friend whose three-year-old son has learned to read solely by using a tablet on his own. Independent work is great for almost all students. Besides being one of the seven learning styles, students benefit from independent work in many ways. Students who are flourishing in class can find lessons related to new material.

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If your students have their own blog, digital portfolio, or website, you may have found that their enthusiasm for writing was initially high.

Frankenstein is the monster essay I would encourage all teachers to check out The Student Blogging Challenge. Here are a few examples: Photos you take yourself. Moreover, the results are delivered in time and for very reasonable price If not, you could write to the blog owner and ask them if they might consider guest post submissions. Another way to get your students excited about reading is by directing them to blogs about entertainment and celebrities. Heck, you might even write something that wins you an adoring fan or two.
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Esl university blog post ideas As an example, you could charge extra for fast delivery or add on esl blog post writing services for college related services like writing blog posts or posting content on websites. If your students have their own blog, digital portfolio, or website, you may have found that their enthusiasm for writing was initially high. Enter the password before downloading the brochure. It talks about why you should start a classroom blog, and mentions all the things you should know to get started, including different resources. You might want to stick to a consistent style or mix things up. Mondo's World Students and teachers alike can take advantage of the numerous video lessons, song lessons, and writing classes on this resource-rich blog.
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Want your students to write more in your class? Looking for prompts or ideas for student blogs, digital portfolios, or websites? Check out examples of student blogs and download the poster about the 10 written or inspiration/ideas you've come across on the web? Reflections on your week as a teacher / trainer. Write about what you have done with your students, any new ideas you have tried out, any problems you have had.